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MilagroGramz
(@milagrogramz)
Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 206
21/04/2020 4:58 pm  

These subject matters bring so much taboo in our communities! Let's talk about it. 

Do you practice? Are you completely against it? What do you know about these faiths and practices? Nothing is off limits. Talk about it. 

Remain respectful of people's thoughts, opinions, and beliefs. ❤️ 

__________________________

 


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MilagroGramz
(@milagrogramz)
Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 206
21/04/2020 5:03 pm  

My mother was raised by her grandmother, whose side of the family is Catholic. 

I was raised by my mother's mother, so my grandmother who was Christian Baptist while still being fiercely superstitious and involved with African/Creole customs and beliefs. A complete contradiction right?

My family is from New Orleans, Louisiana. My grandmother was born in Houston due to my family fleeing the city. Certain things are in my bloodline and I am so interested in learning more about these topics. 

Would you accept the religion given to you by your oppressor? When I answered that question with a no I broke a chain for myself personally. 

How do y'all feel about the fear instilled in us as Christians coming up as it pertains to even entertaining things of this nature?


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ConcreteRose12
(@concreterose12)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 217
21/04/2020 5:32 pm  

I'm African, raised in America. I've heard about some things because of my culture but I do not practice. I feel like it is to be used with caution. You need to know what you're doing or it could backfire. It's not wise to only use it for evil intent and/or selfish reasons.

Ole girl has had quite a few connections to a Goddess named Oshun. Oshun (known as Ochún or Oxúm in Latin America) also spelled Ọṣun, is an orisha, a spirit, a deity, or a goddess that reflects one of the manifestations of the Yorùbá Supreme Being in the Ifá oral literature and Yoruba-based religions. Oshun is able to turn into a peacock in folklore. Ole girl has that huge peacock tattoo and has dressed like her (Billboard Music Awards). Kinoputiya on IG has some info on this:

 


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Bluepitome
(@bluepitome)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 158
23/04/2020 11:49 am  

@concreterose12   kinoputiya is the truth. She suggested some books for me to read to learn more about spirituality. 


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Bluepitome
(@bluepitome)
Estimable Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 158
23/04/2020 11:49 pm  

@milagrogramz -- 

Do you practice?

No I haven't practice although I have had an experience with a Voodoo Queen as a child and it wasn't by choice. I was so afraid because she was speaking in another language. She also gave me a reading and was so spot on. 

Are you completely against it?

No I am not against it because believe that there is a good and bad in Voodoo and Hoodoo. We just have to open our minds to fully understand it.  

What do you know about these faiths and practices? 

As far as Voodoo, I only know of what I have experienced as a kid and seen end results from other people. I am from a small country town in South Louisiana named Franklin. It's Cajun/Creole nation in that area.  


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Aiaurum
(@aiaurum)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 13
24/04/2020 9:11 pm  

Do you practice?

Yes, I do practice it. I practice a variation of Voodoo; Haitian, Louisiana, and a bit of traditional West African Vodun. Growing up in a modern day black family, the typical spiritual/religious practices were Christianity/Baptist. Although it was something I tried to identify with to make my family comfortable and happy, I didn’t connect with it at all. I hated going to church and being forced to be taught practices I didn’t believe in. And although I don’t believe in Christianity, rather than continuing to rebel and be sacrilegious, at this point in my life, I respect it because other people’s hearts value it and they use it as a navigation system/life guide to better their life and other peoples lives. When I had more freedom and independence as I got older, as well as my own money, I picked it up and researched and purchased items I needed to understand the religion more and perfect my practice. It was something I’ve always wanted to do. Tracing back my African roots in general was something my spirit pulled me towards and it brought a new found genuine happiness, security and light to my life. It’s something myself and my best friend have bonded over as well since he is a practitioner himself. I celebrate it. It’s something to be proud of. It has changed me for the better and I’ve fallen completely in love with what I do. 🔮🙏🏾🖤

 

Are you completely against it?

No, I’m not against it. I don’t think anyone should be, especially people of African descent. It’s not something to be ashamed of, but it’s not something you ’have‘ to practice and/or believe in just because you’re black. However, it’s something that should be respected, with an open mind, as well as respecting the people who do practice this and believe in it. We’ve been so brainwashed by our oppressors to believe that this part of our rich and beautiful history is to be under-worldly, dark and demonic, just to turn around and practice it themselves and attempt to claim it as their own lol. This is a beautiful, powerful practice created by our people, for our people and it has helped our people. I proudly celebrate it and worship deities that look like me. That alone is enough for it to be revered.

 

What do you know about these faiths and practices?

I won’t list everything cause what I’ve typed is long enough already, but I’m more familiar with Haitian and Louisiana Voodoo. It almost seems as if learning the roots of West African Vodun are somehow hidden in plain sight for me or maybe I just haven’t dug deep enough yet (something I’ll continue to do). It’s not something I’m completely clueless of, however when I’m more informed, it’s something I’ll definitely be more involved in.

 

I’m still learning all of the Orishas; their likes and dislikes, dances, placements. It’s so fun and lifting. I’ve also learned a lot about the honorable Mrs. Marie Laveau (aka my self proclaimed great-great-great-great grandma lol 💁🏾‍♀️). I’ve even named my alter ego after her in respect (Velvet Laveau 🔮) I’d appreciate if anyone could send me links to any books or knowledgeable mambos/practitioners that could help.

 

But thank you for making this a topic and being so open Mia. 🤍💣


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Lanalana
(@lanalana)
New Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 1
03/12/2021 9:09 am  

@bluepitome hello can you please let me know what books?


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